Scene in passing

parking  lotDoes a driver really need 4 spots to park his truck?  In a busy parking lot in the middle of the day (grocery store parking lot)

Photo credit : Neil Bousquet

Thank you

We like “well lit” rooms

British Columbians saved only 15 megawatt hours of electricity for this year’s Earth Hour, the lowest savings in the past eight years.

By turning off unnecessary lights and electronics for one hour, the province reduced its electricity load by 0.2 per cent according to BC Hydro. That’s the equivalent of turning off 680,000 LED lights.

The savings are well below those recorded in 2013, when a 1.95 per cent reduction was achieved — the greatest in the past eight years.

Statistics from BC Hydro show a significant drop in the savings of megawatt hours of electricity over the past eight Earth Hours in the province.

Earth Hour began as a one-city initiative in Sydney, Australia in 2007 and is now a global event hosted by the World Wildlife Fund.

Yesterday Whistler had the most lights-out of any municipality in B.C. It reduced its electricity load by 7.2 per cent while Vancouver only managed 0.7 per cent.

The lowest reduction recorded by BC Hydro was a tie between Courtenay, Comox and Fort Nelson at 0.1 per cent.

Source CBC

Venting index

The internet is a wonderful tool to access endless information or to keep in contact with friends and family around the world. However, some individuals use the internet as a tool to cause harm and to commit criminal acts.

The Kelowna RCMP recently investigated a report of threats after an individual posted comments of a threatening nature on their Facebook page. It is important that internet and computer users be mindful that what you post online is there forever and that people reading these posts may misinterpret them differently then the intended message. Unfortunately, some people chose to use the internet as a medium to vent their frustrations. It is valuable to know that if you vent frustration on certain social media sites and threats are involved it can constitute a criminal offence.

“RCMP take threats very seriously,” says Cpl. Joe Duncan spokesman for the Kelowna RCMP. “The Kelowna RCMP will investigate the matter thoroughly and lay the appropriate criminal charge.”

Arty Smarty

mavis two22Emma Lennox 8, says “The war that happens everyday in this beautiful world must cease! The time the world has till it ends, will be much happier with peace.”

 

Erik 7, signs his Peace Pledge for Mavis Grant. (below)

Photos and story by Leza Macdonaldmavis three22mavis one

The kids from Arty Smarty at the Oliver Community Centre completed paintings for the World Summit of Nobel Peace Laureates, Children’s Art show in Washington DC. Organizer Mavis Grant stopped by. Left to right Emma, Erik, Leza, Raj, Mavis, Waris and Riley.

Opera is fun

quint22Bob Park photograph taken Friday night at the QuintEssence performance. More than 300 people packed the Frank Venables Theatre and had a lot of fun with this last concert of the regular season.

Left to right are pianist Tina Chang, baritone Peter Alexander, mezzo soprano Barbara Towell, soprano Robyn Driedger-Klassen and tenor Frederik Robert.

This delightful ‘opera is fun’ concert is the perfect warm up for a very special concert. Jenavieve Moore, lyric soprano, who arrives from Europe soon will be performing on the same stage Friday, April 10th. Tickets on sale at Beyond Bliss in Oliver.

Rural report with Laird Smith

Easter is coming around, and with that I have several stories to relate.

I remember as a young boy when Auntie Kay would plan the Easter egg hunt by talking about it. She would get us excited about the event then would bring out the hard boiled eggs, and the dyes.

Once the pots were filled with hot water we would stir in the dyes. When the dyes were ready we would carefully place the eggs into the pots one at a time and roll them around with a spoon. When you got the color you wanted then the egg would be removed and allowed to dry. I liked the blue ones best. When all were colored we were ready for Easter, at least we children were.

Easter morning, Auntie Kay would hide the eggs in the house and outside of the house.
We children would awaken, dress, and eagerly begin the hunt.
A favorite place to look was the lilac tree because there was always one there. There was always an egg or two on the window sills inside and out. There were a few in among the plants too. We didn’t have to venture far from the house to find the eggs.

Once the hunt was finished we would eat breakfast, but we wouldn’t eat the colored eggs, I’m not sure what Auntie Kay did with them.

Auntie Kay also had an Easter basket which had candied eggs in it. Some were chocolate and some were colored candy with a soft, white, sugary center. She made sure we all got a candy. I always liked the chocolate ones the best.

When Easter fell on a Sunday we all had to go to church, I never did like that. The pews were hard and uncomfortable and I had great difficulty sitting still.

On occasion I would take an apple in my pocket and eat it while the preacher spoke, but the crunching embarrassed one of my sisters, she would poke me and I would poke her back and continue eating.

Moving on to years later when I was living and working in Walla Walla Washington, I was married at the time and we had a four year old daughter in play school.

In preparation for Easter, her class had dyed and decaled hard boiled eggs. She brought three of them home and told her Mother that her teacher said that the eggs could be eaten. My wife agreed with the teacher and stepped out of the room to go do something.

Upon her return to the room, she discovered that our daughter had eaten two of the three eggs, shell and all, she didn’t know she had to peel them first.

My wife called the poison centre and was told that our daughter would be fine except that she would have loose stools for the next couple of days. Daughter was fine and saw another Easter, and so did we.

email: ruralreportwithlairdsmith@gmail.com

Osoyoos Sunday Nighters take the 2nd annual

Men in black took the game and the tournament – bruised but not beaten – David Zakall – Osoyoos Sunday Nighters

crime one33

OLIVER FLYERS

HOCKEY CLUB

2nd ANNUAL TOURNAMENT

Sunday, March 29, 2015

Game 13. 8:00am – 9:25am

8th Place – SUMMERLAND CANUCKS vs 3rd place - OIL/SUNSHINE CREW

RESULT: OIL/SUNSHINE CREW beat SUMMERLAND CANUCKS by a score of 5 to 4

Game 14. 9:15 am – 10:30 am

1st Place – WOLF CREEK vs 6th Place – PENTICTON 911

RESULT: PENTICTON 911 beat WOLF CREEK by a score of 4 to 3

Game 15. 10:30am – 11:45 am

2nd Place – OLIVER FLYERS vs 4th Place – OSOYOOS SUNDAY NIGHTERS

RESULT: OS SUNDAY NIGHTERS beat OLIVER FLYERS by a score of 5 to 2

Game 16 11:45 am – 1:00pm

7th Place – SUMMERLAND CULLS vs 5th Place – K-TOWN BUCKAROOS

RESULT: K-TOWN BUCKAROOS beat SUMMERLAND CULLS by a score of 6 to 1

Game 17. 1:00pm – 2:15pm

Winner of game 13 – OIL/SUNSHINE CREW vs winner of game 14 – PENTICTON 911

RESULT: PENTICTON 911 beat OIL/SUNSHINE CREW by a score of 7 to 4

Game 18. 2:15pm – 3:15pm

Winner of game 15 – OSOYOOS SUNDAY NIGHTERS vs winner of game 16 – K-TOWN BUCKAROOS

RESULT: OSOYOOS SUNDAY NIGHTERS beat K-TOWN BUCKAROOS by a score of 8 to 5

Game 19. 3:45 pm – 5:00pm

Winner of game 17 – PENTICTON 911 vs winner of game 18 – OSOYOOS SUNDAY NIGHTERS

RESULT: OSOYOOS SUNDAY NIGHTERS beat PENTICTON 911 by a score of 6 to 3

OSOYOOS SUNDAY NIGHTERS TOOK FIRST PLACE IN THE TOURNAMENT

Thanks to Lynne Smith and the Oliver Lioness/Lions Club

Penticton artists honoured

Update:

Three winners from South Okanagan –

Design: Avante Kiosks (Okanagan Falls)

Media Arts: Chris Stenberg (Penticton)

Visual Arts: Glen Clarke (Penticton)

award22Nominees Announced for the 2015 Okanagan Arts Awards

The Arts Council of the Central Okanagan is pleased to announce the finalists for the 8th Annual Okanagan Arts Awards. Local artists, art supporters and organizations will be recognized for their commitments and excellence in the arts.

The Okanagan Arts Awards honours artists from various disciplines though 14 different categories: Visual Arts, Theatre, Dance, Music, Literary, Design, Media Arts, Graphic Arts, Culinary, Supporter of the Arts, Arts Educator, Arts Organization and Youth and Lifetime Achievement. The nominees represent a wide range of talents from communities throughout the Okanagan/Thompson Valley.

And the nominees are:

Central Okanagan Foundation Arts Association Award
Alternator Centre for Contemporary Art
Enderby Artists Initiative
Okanagan Archive Trust Society – Brian Wilson

Arts Educator
Alexandra Babbel (Kelowna)
Delphine Derickson  (Westbank)
Nancy Holmes (Kelowna)
Randy Leslie (Kelowna)

Culinary
Nick Growing (Kelowna)
Michael Lyon (Kelowna)

Dance
Get Bent School of Belly Dance and Performing Arts (Penticton)
Jordan McAlpine (Kelowna)
Shani Wendell (Lake Country)

Design
Avante Kiosks (Okanagan Falls) – Winner
Kaitlan Murphy (Revelstoke)

Graphic Arts
David MacCoubrey (Penticton)
Kyle Poirier (Kelowna)
Mishell Raedeke (Kelowna)

Literary Arts
Patricia Ainslie (West Kelowna)
Jennifer Schell (Kelowna)
Dona Sturmanis (Kelowna)

Media Arts
Chris Stenberg (Penticton) – Winner
K.A.S.P. Entertainment (Penticton)

Music
Dennis Colpits (Kelowna)
Ben Klick (West Kelowna)
Ernst Schneider (Penticton)

Supporter of the Arts
Lynda Norman (Kelowna)
Tatianna O’Donnell (Enderby)
Shelly Vida (Kelowna)

Theatre
Asparagus Community Theatre (Armstrong)
David Kopp (Kelowna)
Many Hats Theatre Co. (Penticton)

Visual Arts
Glen Clarke (Penticton) – winner
Jolene Mackie (Kelowna)
Chris Malmkvist (Lake Country)

Youth
Kelsie Balehowsky (Kelowna)
Nikolas Filipiric (Penticton)
Cynthia Leigh-Ann (Kelowna)

The Awards Ceremony was held Saturday, March 28th at the Rotary Arts Centre in Kelowna.

Barry Johnson Classic

barry  johnson classic22 Barry Johnson passed away  recently so his friends and FMGC members have named a competition for him The Barry Johnson Classic was played Saturday at Fairview Mountain. The weather great. Everyone enjoyed themselves

 

Thanks to FMGC for the picture